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Our Program
Distinctive features of The Rising School’s program:
  • Challenging courses aligned to rigorous standards
  • Instruction by great teachers based on research-based methods
  • Personal attention for all students
  • Extra help for students who need it (including students with special needs)
  • A safe and orderly learning environment
  • A welcoming environment
  • Family and community involvement
  • Class sizes targeted at 25 students or less
Challenging Courses Aligned to Rigorous Standards

The Rising School will focus on creating a great college-prep school that is one of the best academic schools in Arizona. TRS’s curriculum, instruction, and assessments will be aligned to Arizona’s current College and Career Readiness Standards (Common Core Standards + 2010 Arizona Additions) and CCRS-aligned assessments, such as the state standardized assessment exams. Courses will also incorporate college-readiness content and skills aligned to AP, ACT, SAT, and other assessments. Students assessed in the bottom quartile based on CCRS-aligned formative assessments in math, reading, and writing will be required to take, in addition to all of the core courses, an intervention course in math, reading, or writing. The school will employ other intervention strategies—including a study skills course, plentiful tutoring, and elements of the Response to Intervention program—as the school focuses on academic progress for every student.

Homework Policies

Homework can be a controversial subject. As such, we have thoroughly researched the numerous scholarly studies on the topic, which have analyzed the real-life experiences of thousands and thousands of students of all ages. Based on the results of that extensive research, we have adopted the following homework policies.

Research clearly demonstrates that homework benefits students’ academic achievement, especially as students get older and must become more independent as learners. For example, Professor Harris M. Cooper, in a meta-analysis that examined over 120 separate studies on homework’s effect on students’ academic achievement, found the following: “These studies revealed that the average high school student in a class doing homework would outperform 75% of the students in a no-homework class.”

To most effectively increase student learning, however, homework must be assigned appropriately. To be appropriate, homework must be proper in the amount, the level of challenge, and the purpose. Additionally, appropriate homework does not require parents to act as teachers for their child’s homework.

To make sure that homework is appropriate, our teachers follow these guidelines:

• As a group, our teachers and principal carefully monitor the amount of homework so that it is appropriate to students’ grade level and does not take too much time away from other home activities. We set a rough guideline of a maximum of homework from all classes combined at 60 minutes per day for 6th graders, 70 for 7th graders, 80 for 8th graders, and 90 for 9th graders. Please note: these are rough guidelines, and it is possible that, on rare occasions, more than this amount of homework may be assigned. But if this ever occurs, we promise that it will be an uncommon and unusual occurrence.

• Teachers assign homework that does not require parents to act as teachers. Parents’ involvement in homework is limited to: 1) setting up a quiet, comfortable setting for their children to complete their homework, and 2) asking questions of their child about their homework and serving as a sounding board to help students summarize what they learned in class and in their homework.

• Teachers assign homework that is set at the appropriate level of difficulty so that the student can and will complete it. Thus, appropriate homework is: 1) manageable enough for students to complete independently, and 2) challenging enough to be interesting.

• Teachers assign homework that has a legitimate purpose. Legitimate purposes include introducing new content, practicing a skill that students can do independently without parental help, elaborating on classroom information to deepen students’ knowledge, and providing opportunities for students to explore topics that interest them.

It is interesting to note that students live 8760 hours each year (24 hours x 365 days). Yet they are in school less than 1100 hours per year. Thus, students spend only 1/8th of their lives in classes at school. We believe that a small fraction of that other 7/8ths of their lives can be spent on doing appropriate homework assignments that have been demonstrated to improve their academic achievement. That should still leave time for everything else that they want to do.

In addition, the school provides time for students to do homework at school. Our doors are open 1 hour before classes start and 1.5 hours after classes end; we strongly encourage students to do homework during this time. Moreover, each student has 2.5 hours per week of Study Skills class, where it is possible for student to complete homework. Finally, we encourage every teacher to provide time at the end of class so that students can begin their homework assignments.

Watch Video

Principal George Rising discusses The Rising School’s academic philosophy, including our Homework policies, on KGUN 9′s The Morning Blend talk show:

Highlights of the Rising School

Instruction by Great Teachers

The school’s principal, Dr. George Rising, is an experienced educator, and will be the school’s instructional leader. The principal will be responsible for hiring, supervising, and evaluating teachers. Teachers’ expertise in content and instruction will be demonstrated through advanced degrees in their teaching subject, previous effective classroom experience, and observation/evaluations by the principal, faculty peers, and students. The principal’s evaluation of teachers will rely heavily (50%) on their students’ academic growth as demonstrated by classroom-level data, in alignment with the Arizona Framework for Measuring Educator Effectiveness. The principal and teachers will work together in a weekly Professional Learning Community, professional-development opportunities, and planning periods to create curriculum, refine instruction, and analyze assessment and other data. The goal will be courses that are rigorous, challenging, engaging, and relevant.Great teaching is the heart of The Rising School. At our school, teaching will be a demanding job, requiring expert content knowledge, effective instructional implementation, personal approachability, organization ability, and collaboration skills. To achieve success, teachers will receive support from colleagues, instructional leaders, and support staff. The school will promote a culture that promotes teamwork, which is one of four foundational elements necessary for students to grow academically (ACSA, 2008). Teachers will not remain in their classrooms all day, isolated from their peers. Rather, they will gather in a climate that promotes getting the job done together in weekly Professional Learning Communities (DuFour et al., 2010) and other settings.The Rising School’s Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) will be small groups (5-10) of teachers who work together at least once per week. PLCs will not be typical faculty meetings, where teachers listen to a monologue from the principal about procedural and policy issues. Instead, the foci of PLCs are for teachers to learn from and with each other about professional issues generally and student-based issues specifically. Each PLC will be facilitated by an Instructional Leader who has been trained in coaching and protocols for effective PLCs. The teachers will receive professional development on working in these groups. In PLCs, teachers will research, bring in, and discuss effective curriculum, instructional, assessment methods. Teachers will also closely analyze student work together, allowing them to help each other and to gain a common professional eye. Together, PLC members will develop common assessments, grade student work, and evaluate the effectiveness of assessments. Teachers will receive 1.5 hours of learning in Professional Learning Committees and will get two weeks of professional development before the school year starts and four days after the year ends. Dr. Rising and other master teachers will serve as faculty coaches.Faculty members will embrace the notion that teaching at The Rising School requires:

  • Closely collaborating with students and colleagues in a small, friendly community
  • Working in teaching teams, supporting colleagues, and being supported
  • Serving primarily as a “coach” or “mentor” to facilitate students’ learning-by-doing
  • Teaching students as they work in groups
  • Discovering and using outside resources—including online materials, local experts, and local places of learning (museums, universities, etc.)—to support students’ learning
  • Focusing on teaching 21st century skills
  • Connecting academic content to students’ social and emotional issues
  • Developing as a teacher by improving professional knowledge and instructional skills

With help from colleagues, instructional leaders, and other sources, teachers will be required to create a series of detailed instructional structures for their courses. These structures comprise three levels. First, all teachers will create a syllabus for each course. The syllabus presents an overview of the course, giving a timeline of instruction and major assessments. It also explicitly aligns state or AP standards to each instructional element. The syllabus is due by the start of the school year and will be evaluated by the principal and an Instructional leader. Second, teachers will create unit plans, which show the standards, topics, and major activities of each daily lesson plan. Unit plans are due a month before the unit commences, at the start of each month. The principal will collect and evaluate unit plans. Third, teachers will create daily lesson plans, detailed plans that identify all of the daily lesson’s standards, topics, activities, and assessments. For constructing daily lesson plans, the school will use Hunter’s Essential Elements of Instruction (EEI). The elements of an EEI lesson plan include a lesson title, materials, course curriculum standards, an anticipatory set, performance objectives, instructional input, checks for understanding, guided practice, closure, and extended practice (homework). These structures tightly align curriculum with instruction.

With these structures in place, teachers in their classrooms will be trained in and use instructional methods that have been proven effective by research. All teachers will use the nine instructional strategies shown to be have the highest correlation with student success: identifying similarities and differences; summarizing and note-taking; reinforcing effort and providing recognition; homework and practice; nonlinguistic representations; cooperative learning; setting objectives and providing feedback; generating and testing hypotheses; and cues, questions, and advance organizers. Teachers also will use proven instructional techniques associated with Uncommon Schools, such as: no opt out, right is right, stretch it, format matters, circulate, cold call, wait time, everybody writes, 100 percent, strong voice, do it again, positive framing, and joy factor. Through professional development and practice, our teachers will deeply understand and consistently employ these proven pedagogical methods.

The faculty will also share common instructional philosophies for presenting and assessing content and skills. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revised will be a foundational element of instruction. Bloom’s Revised is a classification of six orders of cognition organized by level of complexity: remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating. Bloom’s will be a common reference point for teachers when they devise instruction and, equally important, for students when they reflect on learning. For teachers, Bloom’s will provide an effective strategy to analyze a performance objective and then to scaffold and adjust instruction to lead students to mastery of rigorous material. Teachers will use Bloom’s to develop rigorous assessments, objectives, key points, checks for understanding, strategic questions, and differentiate.

Additionally, teachers will use differentiated instruction tailored to the needs of individual learners. Each teacher will use creative strategies appropriate to their own diverse learners. Teachers will be trained to use Garner’s Multiple Intelligences, which alerts teachers and students to the fact that intelligence is multifaceted, consisting of linguistic, logical, musical, kinesthetic, spatial, naturalist, interpersonal, and intrapersonal intelligence. Using differentiated instruction, teachers will provide students with multiple ways to acquire knowledge and skills by considering their prior knowledge, readiness level, interests, and preferred learning modes to develop lessons and supplemental materials. Teachers will differentiate the lesson content, the process in which it is presented, the product or assessment, and/or the general learning environment. Through differentiation, each student’s individual needs will be met, maximizing his/her potential for growth and success.

An important part of The Rising School’s instruction is adult-world immersion for its students, one of the six design principles for high school design recommended by the New Urban High School project. Through art centers, local newspapers, museums, and other community-based organizations, students can develop or become involved in projects that benefit the community while enhancing their academic learning. Especially important are internships. In the fourth quarter of 12th grade, all students will complete a two-month Senior Internship. Internships will provide authentic settings where students learn problem-solving and other higher-order thinking skills. Internship also will allow students to explore their career interests and observe how adults put together careers.

The principal, along with instructional leaders and others, will ensure that teachers are effectively implementing the school’s curriculum, instruction, and assessment. The principal will make sure that teachers receive training and professional development in the methods outlines above. The principal and other instructional leaders will also ensure that teachers are adhering to the school’s principals and policies through conversations with teachers, observations of teaching, examination of curriculum materials and assessments, and analysis of data on student learning, especially assessment data.

A teacher’s instructional quality will be determined through rigorous, fair evaluation. The goals of the school’s teacher evaluation are to:

  • enhance and improve student learning
  • use the evaluation process and achievement data to drive professional development to enhance teaching, leadership, and student performance
  • increase data-informed decision making for students and teacher and principal evaluations fostering school cultures where student learning and progress is a continual part of redefining goals for all
  • use the evaluation process and data to improve teacher and principal performance; incorporate multiple measurements of achievement
  • communicate clearly defined expectations; reflect fairness, flexibility and a research-based approach
  • create a culture where data drives instructional decisions

Using these proven methods, TRS will achieve higher than average scores in both academic proficiency and academic growth beginning in year one, earning at least a B rating on the A-F School Accountability Letter Grade System. The school’s Accountability score will increase each year, and will be an A ranking by year four and will remain an A thereafter. As we develop a reputation as one of the best schools in Tucson, we expect to draw more and more students from middle-class families seeking a first-class education. From day one, the school will meet the needs of high-achieving students by offering enrichment opportunities in all courses and electives, and will offer many AP courses. TRS’s educational philosophy and program of instruction are based on research and experience.

Personal Attention for All Students

The Rising School will serve the personal education needs of its students. TRS will be a caring community. It will be a small school with class size targeted at 25 or fewer students. To help personalize the program, each student will be appointed an Advisor, a faculty or staff person who monitors the student’s academic and personal development and serves as the contact person for the student’s family. The student will have the same Advisor as long as the student is at the school (up to seven years). Every week, the student will meet with his or her Advisor in an Advisory group along with 10-15 other students. The Advisor—in conjunction with administrators, teachers, the student, and his/her parents—will help the student develop his or her Personal Learning Plan (PLP), which will ensure that the student has a program he or she is comfortable with and is on track to graduate.

Extra Help for Students Who Need It (including students with special needs)

TRS will foster a culture where all students needing help will seek assistance from appropriate sources. Teachers and tutors will be available for students during study time before and after school. Tutoring will also be available during study-skills periods (three hours per week), which are mandatory for every student. Additionally, TRS will identify, through review of students’ assessments and discussion by our teachers, students who are performing poorly or who are at risk of performing poorly. The school will target for intervention the bottom quartile of students identified as having poor math, reading, or writing skills. In addition, TRS will provide extra help to students identified with special needs. Based on market research, 10-15% of students will be identified as having special needs.

A Safe and Orderly Learning Environment

An effective learning environment requires safety and order. To encourage a positive culture and climate, the school will employ the methods of Positive Behavioral Interventions & Support (PBIS) program, developed by the Office of Special Education Programs of the U.S. Department of Education (www.pbis.org). PBIS is a decision-making framework that guides selection, integration, and implementation of the best evidence-based academic and behavioral practices for improving important academic and behavior outcomes for all students. PBIS emphasizes four integrated elements: data for decision making, measurable outcomes supported and evaluated by data, practices with evidence that these outcomes are achievable, and systems that efficiently and effectively support implementation of these practices.

These four elements of PBIS are guided by six important principles: develop a continuum of scientifically based behavior and academic interventions and supports; use data to make decisions and solve problems; arrange the environment to prevent the development and occurrence of problem behavior; teach and encourage positive social skills and behaviors; implement evidence-based behavioral practices with fidelity and accountability; and screen universally and monitor student performance & progress continuously.

PBIS schools organize their evidence-based behavioral practices and systems into an integrated collection or continuum in which students experience supports based on their behavioral responsiveness to intervention. A three-tiered prevention logic requires that all students receive supports at the universal or primary tier. If the behavior of some students is not responsive, more intensive behavioral supports are provided, in the form of a group contingency (selected or secondary tier) or a highly individualized plan (intensive or tertiary tier).

According to the Office of Special Education Programs of the U.S. Department of Education (www.pbis.org), schools that implement PBIS with integrity and durability have teaching and learning environments that:

  • Are less reactive, aversive, dangerous, and exclusionary, and
  • Are more engaging, responsive, preventive, and productive
  • Address classroom management and disciplinary issues (e.g., attendance, tardies, antisocial behavior),
  • Improve supports for students whose behaviors require more specialized assistance (e.g., emotional and behavioral disorders, mental health), and
  • Most importantly, maximize academic engagement and achievement for all students.

A Welcoming Environment

TRS will provide a welcoming atmosphere to these parents and students. The school will embrace an ethic of customer service, viewing parents, students, and community members as a valuable clientele. To ensure clear communication, the school secretary will be fluent in English and Spanish, and bilingual skills will be a preferred qualification for other clerical workers and staff members. The school will provide a welcoming atmosphere in other ways, too. Administrators will have an open-door policy. Administrators and teachers will make home visits. Finally, the school will encourage family and community involvement.

Family and Community Involvement

The Rising School will encourage family and community involvement in several ways. The school will solicit input about its program’s design and structure. In addition, parents or guardians will serve as essential members of the student’s Personal Learning Plan (PLP) team. In creating a PLP, families will meet with the student, teachers, administrators, and other team members several times during the year to develop and revise the PLP. Families also will participate actively in the assessment of their children’s portfolios and exhibitions.

Additionally, TRS will implement a structure for systematic family and community participation in the school based on the recommendations of the National Network of Partnership Schools. The school will focus on six main types of involvement: parenting, communicating, volunteering, learning at home, decision making, and collaborating with the community. The first type of involvement, parenting, assists families in understanding child and adolescent development and in setting home conditions that support children as students at each grade level. It also assists schools in understanding families. Second is communicating with families about school programs and school progress through effective school-to-home and home-to-school communications. Third is volunteering, which improves recruitment, training, and schedules to involve families as volunteers and audiences at the school and in other locations to support students and school programs. Fourth is learning at home, which involves families with their children in learning at home, including homework, other curriculum-related activities, and individual course and program decisions. Fifth is decision making, which includes families as participants in school decisions, governance, and advocacy through committees, action teams, and other parent organizations. Finally, the sixth type of involvement is collaborating with the community, which coordinates community resources and services to students, families, and the school with businesses, agencies, and other groups. It also includes providing services to the community.

Class Sizes Targeted at 25 Students or Less

According to a report by the Brookings Institute, the research on the effects of small class size on student achievement is mixed. “But it appears that very large class-size reductions, on the order of magnitude of 7-10 fewer students per class, can have significant long-term effects on student achievement and other meaningful outcomes. These effects seem to be largest when introduced in the earliest grades, and for students from less advantaged family backgrounds” (Whitehurst and Chingos, 2011). The “A” rated schools in the target community have class sizes of 25-28. The Rising School will cap its class sizes at 28 students and will strive to have classes of 25 students or less. TRS’s teacher-student ratio will be: 1-20 (5.0 FTE teachers-100 students) in year one; 1-19.4 (9.0 FTE teachers-175 students) in year two; and 1-18.7 (15.0 FTE teachers-280 students) in year three.

Details of The Rising School’s Academic Program

6th Grade Courses

  • Math:
    • Aligned to College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) for math:
  • English Composition: Aligned to CCRS for writing
  • Humanities (Literature and World History & Geography)
    • Aligned to CCRS for reading and to Arizona state standards for social science
  • Science (Life, Physical, Earth, and Space)
    • Aligned to Arizona state standards for science
  • Fine Arts (Studio Art or Music) or Physical Education
    • Aligned to Arizona state standards for fine arts and physical education
  • Intervention (Math Foundations or English Foundations) or Enrichment
    • Bottom quartile in math, reading, or writing must take Intervention course
  • Study Skills: 2 times per week, 130 minutes total
  • Advisory: 1 time per week, 40 minutes

7th Grade Courses

  • Math:
    • Aligned to College and Career Readiness Standards  (CCRS) for math:
  • English Composition: Aligned to CCRS for writing
  • Humanities (Literature and U.S. History)
    • Aligned to CCRS for reading and Arizona state standards for social science
  • Science (Life, Physical, Earth, and Space)
    • Aligned to Arizona state standards for science
  • Fine Arts (Studio Art or Music) or Physical Education
    • Aligned to Arizona state standards for fine arts and physical education
  • Intervention (Math Foundations or English Foundations) or Enrichment
    • Bottom quartile in math, reading, or writing must take Intervention course
  • Study Skills: 2 times per week, 130 minutes total
  • Advisory: 1 time per week, 40 minutes

8th Grade Courses

  • Math
    • Aligned to College and Career Readiness Standards  (CCRS) for math
  • English Composition: Aligned to CCRS for writing
  • Humanities (Literature and Civics, Government, & Economics)
    • Aligned to CCRS for reading and Arizona state standards for social science
  • Science (Life, Physical, Earth, and Space)
    • Aligned to Arizona state standards for science
  • Fine Arts (Studio Art or Music) or Physical Education
    • Aligned to Arizona state standards for fine arts and physical education
  • Intervention (Math Foundations or English Foundations) or Enrichment
    • Bottom quartile in math, reading, or writing must take Intervention course
  • Study Skills: 2 times per week, 130 minutes total
  • Advisory: 1 time per week, 40 minutes

9th Grade Courses

All 9th grade students take six courses: five core courses and one intervention or elective course.9th Grade Core Courses:

  • Math: Honors Algebra 1/Geometry 1 or Honors Algebra 2/Geometry 2
  • English: Honors World Literature
    • This course, in conjunction with Honors/AP World History, teaches students about major social, religious, philosophical, and cultural issues and themes.
  • English: Honors English Composition
    • This course focuses on further developing students’ writing and is aligned with Common Core writing standards for 9-10 grades.
  • Social Studies: Honors World History or AP World History:
    • Honors World History and AP World History are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP World History includes more content than Honors World History.
  • Science: Honors Biology or AP Biology
    • Honors Biology and AP Biology are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP Biology includes more content than Honors Biology.

9th Grade Intervention or Elective Courses:

  • Students in lowest quartile in math, reading, or writing must take one of the following:
    • Math Essentials 1 or English Essentials 1
  • Students not in the lowest quartile in math, reading, or writing must take one elective:
    • Physical Education, Fine Arts, Computer Science, Media Arts, Conversational Spanish, Creative Writing/Journalism, AP electives, or others

9th Grade Courses: Other:

  • Study Skills: 2 times per week, 130 minutes total
  • Advisory: 1 time per week, 40 minutes

10th Grade Courses

All 10th-graders take six courses: five core courses and one intervention or elective course.10th Grade Core Courses:

  • Math: Algebra 2/Geometry 2 or Pre-Calculus
    • Pre-Calculus: This course extends and refines advanced algebraic and trigonometric concepts and will introduce concepts in probability, statistics, vectors, and parametrics.
  • English: Honors or AP English Language
    • Honors English Language and AP English Language are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP English Language includes more content and writing than Honors English Language.
  • Social Studies: Honors U.S. History or AP U.S. History
    • Honors U.S. History and AP U.S. History are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP U.S. History includes more content than Honors U.S. History.
  • Science: Honors Chemistry or AP Chemistry
    • Honors Chemistry and AP Chemistry are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP Chemistry includes more content than Honors Chemistry.
  • Foreign Language: Spanish 1 or 2 (determined by assessment), French 1, or Mandarin 1

10th Grade Intervention or Elective Courses:

  • Students in lowest quartile in math, reading, or writing must take one of the following:
    • Math Essentials 2 or Reading Essentials 2
  • Students not in the lowest quartile in math, reading, or writing must take one elective:
    • Physical Education, Fine Arts, Computer Science, Media Arts, Creative Writing/Journalism, AP electives, or others

10th Grade Courses: Other:

  • Study Skills: 2 times per week, 130 minutes total
  • Advisory: 1 time per week, 40 minutes

11th Grade Courses

All 11th graders take six courses: five core courses and one intervention or elective course. 11th Grade Core Courses.

  • Math: Pre-Calculus or AP Calculus AB
    • Pre-Calculus: See above.
    • AP Calculus AB: Aligned with AP Calculus AB, it is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus AB exam and for higher-level college courses in mathematics. The major topics covered in this course are:  Functions, Graphs, and Limits; Derivatives; and Integrals.
  • English: Honors or AP English Literature (both aligned to AP English Literature)
    • Honors English Literature and AP English Literature are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP English Literature includes more content and writing than Honors English Literature..
  • Social Science: One-semester course: Honors U.S. Government or AP U.S. Government
    • Honors U.S. Government and AP U.S. Government are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP U.S. Government includes more content than Honors U.S. Government.
  • Social Science: One-semester course: Honors Economics
    • Honors Economics examines microeconomics and macroeconomics.
  • Science: Physics or AP Physics B
    • Honors Physics and AP Physics B are based on the same core concepts and methodologies. AP Physics B includes more content than Honors Physics.
  • Foreign Language: Spanish 2 or 3, French 2, or Mandarin 2

11th Grade Intervention or Elective Courses:

  • Students in lowest quartile in math, reading, or writing must take one of the following:
    • Math Essentials 2 or Reading Essentials 2
  • Students not in the lowest quartile in math, reading, or writing must take one elective:
    • Physical Education, Fine Arts, Computer Science, Media Arts, Creative Writing/Journalism, AP electives, or others

11th Grade Courses: Other:

  • Study Skills: 2 times per week, 130 minutes total
  • Advisory: 1 time per week, 40 minutes

12th Grade Courses

All 12th grade students must take six courses: five core courses and one elective course.12th Grade Core Courses (during first three quarters):

  • Math: AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, or AP Statistics
    • AP Calculus AB: See above
    • AP Calculus BC: This college-level course examines the topics found in a second semester college calculus course. Aligned with AP Calculus BC, it is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus BC exam and for higher-level college courses in math.
    • AP Statistics: This college-level course will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data..
  • English: Honors Senior English
    • This course is modeled after college English courses, requiring reading, analysis, writing, and discussion. Each year, the instructor, with input from students, will determine the topic or theme of the course; examples include Shakespeare’s dramas, contemporary American literature, gender in literature, and African-American literature.
  • Social Science: An AP course in social science
    • Art History, European History, Comparative Government, Human Geography, or Psychology
  • Science: An AP course in science
    • Computer Science A, Environmental Science, Human Geography, or Physics C
  • Foreign Language: Spanish 3 or 4 or AP Spanish, French 3, or Mandarin 3

12th grade Elective Courses (during first three quarters):

  • Students not requiring remediation must take one of the following elective courses:
    • Physical Education, Fine Arts, Computer Science, Media Arts, Conversational Spanish, Creative Writing/Journalism, AP electives, or others.
    • Senior Internship (fourth quarter): Replaces Elective Course in fourth quarter. Senior Internships will provide authentic contexts where students learn problem-solving and other higher-order thinking skills. Students will also explore their career interests.

12th Grade Courses: Other:

  • Study Skills: 2 times per week, 130 minutes total
  • Advisory: 1 time per week, 40 minutes

The Rising School provides a culture of teamwork. One of four foundational elements necessary for students to grow academically (ACSA, 2008)

We focus on six main types of involvement: parenting, communicating, volunteering, learning at home, decision making, and collaborating with the community.

  • The first type assists families in understanding child and adolescent development
  • Second is communicating with families about school programs and school progress
  • Third is volunteering to support students and programs
  • Fourth is learning at home, which involves families with their children
  • Fifth is decision making, which includes families as participants in school decisions
  • The sixth type of involvement is collaborating with the community

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